How Meditation on the Word Helps Us Approach the Throne of God with Confidence

 

In this post we will first discuss prayer as approaching the throne with confidence, and how mediation aids us in that process.  Next, just briefly, we will talk about Jesus as our High Priest and how He gives us confidence in prayer.

 

Meditation Helps Us Approach The Throne of God with Confidence

 

First of all, we need to understand this aspect of prayer—that prayer is an approach to the throne. And it is that, simply because that is the nature of prayer.  According to Spurgeon, “True prayer is an approach of the soul by the Spirit of God to the throne of God.  It is not the utterance of words, it is not alone the feeling of desires, but it is the advance of the desires to God, the spiritual approach of our nature toward the Lord our God.”5

Secondly, we could say that prayer is approaching the throne because that is where Christ is, “sitting at the right hand of God” (Col. 3:1).  Therefore, we ought to set our mind in prayer on things above where Christ is (Col. 3:2).

But there is a third reason why prayer is an approach to the throne.  It is because He desires that we take an active role in “throne life.”  As Duewel describes, “In the same way that you are to count yourself ‘dead to sin but alive to God in Christ Jesus’ (Rom. 6:11), you are to count yourself now enthroned with Christ, your reigning Lord…You are to reign by your prayer just as Jesus reigned by prayer.”6  Thus, says Duewel, “The whole foundation of prevailing prayer is that God has given you constant, instant access to His throne…”7

As we approach the throne we may come with boldness, yet we must come with reverence—with boldness because He has died for us and made propitiation for us, with reverence because He is God.  As Spurgeon writes, “Familiarity there may be, but let it not be unhallowed.  Boldness there should be, but let it not be impertinent.  You are still on earth, and He in heaven. You are still a worm of the dust, and He the Everlasting…Let us ask the Spirit of God to put us in a right frame that every one of our prayers may be a reverential approach to the Infinite Majesty above.”8

Now the role that meditation has is that it helps us to abide in Jesus, so that the Holy Spirit is free to lead the soul to the Father in prayer.  Thus when we meditate and set our mind on things above, the Holy Spirit brings about in us repentance of sin, so that we believe and obey Him—so that in effect the blood of Jesus sprinkles the heart clean, and opens the way for us to the throne.

Moreover, when we meditate on Jesus and on all that is true and noble and just and pure and lovely, then He will come and bring peace to us (Phil. 4:8).  Furthermore, meditation on what is good gives us an alternative to dwelling on what is bad.  Thus, it gives us a way of escape from sinful thoughts (1 Cor. 10:13).

I suggest that you memorize some good verses so you will have some good, pure thoughts and images tucked away in your mind.  Then, if you are tempted to lust, you can think good thoughts of love and purity.  And when you are tempted to be angry, you can instead think thoughts of peace. Meditation, therefore, helps to keep the mind pure and available for Spirit-filled prayer; it helps to move the soul confidently toward the throne of God.

 

Meditation on Jesus Our High Priest Gives Us Confidence in Prayer 

 

We have many reasons to think about Jesus our High Priest:  He is so good and so strong; He does so much for us. By His death and resurrection He saved us from the cruel penalty of sin.  By His intercession He is now saving us from the power of sin. Soon He will appear to deliver us from the very presence of sin (Heb. 9:24).

As our High Priest, He sympathizes with our weaknesses, because He was in all points tempted as we are, yet without sin.  Thus, when we approach the throne of grace, we receive from God through Christ all the mercy and grace we need to help us in our time of need (Heb. 4:16).

When we ponder these things we can’t help having confidence as we approach the throne of God.

 

 

5 Charles Spurgeon, The Power of Prayer in a Believers Life, p. 15.

6 Wesley Duewel, Mighty Prevailing Prayer (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Francis Asbury Press, of Zondervan Publishing House, 1990), p. 50.

7 Ibid., p. 44.

8 Charles Spurgeon, The Power of Prayer in a Believers Life, pp. 17-18.

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About Stephen Nielsen

I'm an author, a self publisher, and a painting contractor. I live in beautiful Minnesota, USA . Welcome to my blog site.
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